Spring is just around the corner! What a Change in Seasons Means for Your Indoor Air Quality

The seasons are changing. The weather is getting warmer. The days are lasting longer. And, right now your home’s indoor air is more vulnerable to pollution caused by pollen and other debris.

As spring approaches, it’s vital that you pay attention to your indoor air quality, particularly because outdoor air quality during this time of year can be so problematic. If you suffer from allergies during the springtime, or if you’re just looking to achieve better indoor air quality within your home, read on to find out how springtime impacts your indoor air quality.

How Springtime Affects Indoor Air Quality

Here’s a quick breakdown of how the coming spring can start to impact the air quality inside your home:

Pollen

Check your favorite weather station for local pollen alerts, and act accordingly. When the pollen is high, you don’t want to have your windows open wide as this will allow pollen inside your home. If you suffer from seasonal allergies, you’re just asking for an allergy attack. Even if you aren’t a seasonal allergy sufferer, it’s not good to have pollen building up within your home as it can seriously affect the quality of your living environment.

Water

As we all know, springtime brings plenty of rain showers to Ohio, and with these showers come excess moisture in the air and a susceptibility to leaks in the home from storms or heavy rains. Prevent water from entering your home by making sure there are no cracks or gaps on your roof or foundation where water could easily enter. Standing water in your home can cause mold, which can be detrimental to indoor air quality. If you suspect any mold in your home, call an expert immediately to remove it.

Dust

Because of improper ventilation during the colder months, dust can settle into vents, registers, and eventually ductwork, making it close to impossible to rid your home of these irritating pollutants. The best way to combat these issues is to clean your home’s vents and registers regularly, and have your ductwork inspected. Your ductwork is the main passageway for air that moves through your home. If dust and debris are found to have built-up within your ducts, it’s a good idea to get your ducts sealed and cleaned to prevent this polluted air from constantly cycling throughout your home. Once your ductwork is cleaned and any gaps within it are sealed, you can start to enjoy the benefits of better air quality immediately afterwards.

Why Spring Cleaning is Important

Our indoor air quality can really suffer as the seasons begin to change, especially after a harsh Ohio winter when we tend to close up our doors tightly and not open the windows. Spring can be an ideal time to rid your house of dust and debris that may have settled in over the winter, but you’ll need to dig deeper than surface cleaning to truly combat pollutants in your air. That’s why it’s important to deep clean your house during your spring cleaning. This helps you rid your home of harmful pollutants in the air that may have collected over winter time.

While you are spring cleaning, you might notice that you’re starting to kick up dust that has settled over the winter. One way to help cycle this dust through your air filter is to use the “run” or “cycle” setting on your thermostat immediately after vacuuming. This will help capture particles before they settle back down onto surfaces within your home. Run for 30 minutes and then switch back on to your normal settings.

You may also want to consider upgrading your HVAC filter to a HEPA filter if you haven’t switched yet. These filters trap a considerable amount of particles in the air that traditional air filters can miss, creating a cleaner and healthier environment for you and your family. If you need help finding the right air filter for you, contact us today.

Do I need an Air Purifier? And Other Frequently Asked Questions About Maintaining Home Comfort

Homeownership is rewarding, but it can be a difficult thing to navigate for both new and seasoned homeowners alike. We’ve compiled a list of some very commonly asked questions about maintaining home comfort.

Home Comfort: Frequently Asked Questions

Here are some of the home comfort questions that we most often here from our customers:

Q: Do I need an air purifier?

A: It depends. There are several circumstances when it would be a good idea to think about getting an air purifier. If your home smells of varnish, adhesive (from carpets), or other noxious scents, then an air purifier would be a good idea. Also, if you notice a lot of excess dust particles in your home, even after cleaning, then an air purifier could help to clean the air.

If anyone in your home suffers from respiratory issues, an air purifier can help to keep maintain excellent indoor air quality for you and your loved ones’ health.

Q: Will houseplants actually improve my indoor air quality?

A: Houseplants can be quite beneficial to your home’s air. Seek out broad leafed plants or plants with a lot of leafy surface area, such as ivy and ferns. Plants help clean the air by taking in pollutants from the air, such as harmful gases, and converting them into oxygen. This helps make the air cleaner and purer while adding a little greenery to your living environment.

Q: Should I make special consideration if I have pets?

A: Yes. Pay close attention to areas of your home where dust collects as it can be particularly bad with pets. These are the areas where pet-friendly homes collect extra dander and pet debris, such as around vents, and behind large furniture and appliances. Excess dust and debris can get caught up in your home’s air ducts by way of your HVAC system.

To prevent buildup of pet dander and debris, clean your home on a regular basis. Make sure to vacuum carpets, furniture, and drapes or curtains regularly. You may also want to have your ductwork cleaned professionally, and invest in a special HVAC air filter to trap pet debris.

Q: What’s the ideal temperature to set your home’s thermostat?

A: Even though 72ºF seems to be the common default temperature for your home, it really depends on the time of year and the temperature outside. It’s actually beneficial for both your budget and your health if you set your thermostat to run a little “less comfortably” than you’d expect. For instance, in the wintertime, try setting your thermostat at 69ºF.

In the wintertime, for every degree you decrease, you could save up to 5% in energy costs. In fact, according to the National Sleep Association, we actually may sleep best at a cooler temperature, especially when covered with blankets.

The same goes for the summertime. Instead of cranking your air conditioner on the coldest setting you can tolerate, try setting it a bit above what you normally would, and use ceiling fans and open windows to circulate air throughout your home.

Q: What is Sick Building Syndrome? Is my home at risk?

A: Sick building syndrome, or sick house syndrome, is a phenomenon that describes an experience of malaise that occurs in occupants of homes and other buildings, most likely due to poor air quality. Symptoms can include headaches, flu-like symptoms, dizziness, and ear nose and throat irritation.

To prevent this from occurring in your home, increase ventilation as well as air distribution within the home. If you are aware of strong pollutants, then your home’s air will need to be vented to flow outside of your home. Another helpful way to prevent sick building syndrome is to have routine professional maintenance performed on your HVAC system to ensure it’s running smoothly year-round. You should also work to control any standing water or moisture in your home, which could lead to mold growth.

If you need professional HVAC maintenance or duct sealing, contact us today. Both of these services will help ensure you and your family will reap the rewards of excellent air quality within your home. Give us a call today to learn more: 513-612-9201.